© Royal Australian Navy. Powered by Newscoop. “I‘ll be in charge of a small medical capability and this comes with increased responsibility. Emphasis is placed on the contra­indications to diving and the diving medical assessment, together with the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of common diving-­related illnesses. “We put a lot of effort into preparing our students for employment at sea, ashore and with the special operations command,” he said. Over the last four years, 11 members of this close knit and specialised community have worked across a number of locations in roles ranging from pre-hospital care through to tertiary hospital-based services. Underwater Medicine specialists adapt for desert role, 'Excellence under pressure' - enhancing inter agency relations, Students from the Underwater Medical Course at HMAS Penguin put through their paces, Reunion on the high seas for Ballarat pilot, Driving regional relationships during Exercise MALABAR, Ballarat, a committed capability in the Indo Pacific. 4. submit a written proposal for research in a relevant area of underwater or hyperbaric medicine, in a standard format, for approval before commencing their research project. Petty Officer Underwater Medicine Clinician Heath Winter has just completed a deployment to Afghanistan, where he worked for the NATO Special Forces Joint Task Force. Petty Officer Winter has also been an instructor on the Underwater Medicine Clinicians’ Course and also speaks highlight of the training it provides. The Underwater Medicine Clinicians’ Course is held annually in HMAS Penguin and is advertised by both Navy and Army career management agencies. Chief Petty Officer Burns said this deployment would be unlike any of his experiences on previous operations. “We put a lot of effort into preparing our students for employment at sea, ashore and with the special operations command,” he … Beyond the traditional setting of providing operational healthcare to divers, underwater medicine clinicians are now using these clinical dexterities to treat battle casualties in less traditional domains. The changing face of modern warfare, combined with emerging clinical science has driven a change in the education of underwater medicine clinicians. Graduates of course 21 of the RAN Underwater Medicine Clinician course celebrated the completion of seven months of training. “This sort of work demands the highest quality of graduate and we have all delivered to that standard since 1967,” Petty Officer Winter said. Chief Petty Officer Underwater Medicine Clinician Zamri Burns is preparing to return to the Middle East, this time to Afghanistan. Defence Underwater medicine clinicians graduate. Published on 11 March 2019 Royal Australian Navy (author), SGT Ricky Fuller (photographer), Topic(s): HMAS Penguin, Submarine Underwater Medical Unit. These clinicians provide care in isolated and remote settings, often without clinical supervision at hand. Underwater medicine clinicians are medics drawn from the Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army, who receive additional specialised training in diving medicine. As part of the Australian Defence Force’s ongoing commitment to the war in Afghanistan, Royal Australian Navy underwater medicine clinicians and doctors are deployed to this arid and rugged landscape, far away from the oceans where they usually ply their trade. To provide this capability, underwater medicine clinicians are qualified in a range of critical care skills such as advanced life support, surgical procedures and airway management. Petty Officer Winter said his training as both an underwater medicine clinician and a paramedic enabled him to work at the tip of the spear, providing pre-hospital care in a high-functioning combat unit. Designed by Sourcefabric. Chief Petty Officer Burns has been an instructor on the course and said the training it offered was first class. “This has been the best deployment and I would encourage any Navy or Army medic to consider a career in underwater medicine if this type of work appeals to them,” he said. Chief Petty Officer Burns has been an instructor on the course and said the training it offered was first class. Tactical combat casualty care and operational planning have been recent additions to the curriculum that serves these personnel well in war zones like Afghanistan. “The experience and skills I have gained in the last 15 years have enabled me to work independently in a high threat environment,” Petty Officer Winter said. “This really is one of the most advanced and specialised courses a medic can complete in the Australian Defence Force. 3. have completed the equivalent (as determined by the Education Officer) of at least six months’ full-time clinical training in an approved Hyperbaric Medicine Unit. The Physicians Training in Diving Medicine" course has been formally approved by the Diving Medical Advisory Committee (DMAC) and the European Diving Technology Committee (EDTC) as a DMAC/EDTCmed Level 2D: Medical management of diving accidents and illnesses (Diving Medicine Physician) course until April 2020. The Underwater Medicine Clinicians’ Course is held annually in HMAS Penguin and is advertised by both Navy and Army career management agencies. The MOUM course seeks to provide the medical practitioner with an understanding of the range of potential medical problems faced by divers. “The training I have undertaken thus far and my tertiary studies have all played a part in me getting to this stage in my career,” Chief Petty Officer Burns said.
2020 underwater medicine clinicians course